Safety for Diwali, Festival of Lights

Safety for Diwali, Festival of Lights

Diwali, the Festival of Lights, is celebrated with fervor and gaiety by the people of every faith in India.

A celebration takes no time to turn to a disaster for a missing small precaution. Last year the night of Diwali turned into dark as many persons reached different hospitals of country with eye and burn injuries.
Mishandling of firecrackers can cause

  • Burns
  • Eye injuries
  • Hearing loss,
  • Sleeping disturbances and
  • Sudden exposure to loud noise can cause temporary or permanent deafness or even result in heart attack .
  • Pets such as dogs and cats also suffer on account of firecrackers as animals have a more sensitive sense of hearing than humans.

Exercise precaution have a safe Diwali

Observing that the ‘Right to Sleep’ is a fundamental right, the Government of India has banned firecrackers between 10 pm and 6 am on Diwali.

According to the Environmental Protection Act, 1986, bursting crackers within a 100- metre radius of schools, hospitals, courts and religious institutions is a punishable offence.

This Diwali, ensure your and your loved ones safety.

Observing that the ‘Right to Sleep’ is a fundamental right, the Government of India has banned firecrackers between 10 pm and 6 am on Diwali.

According to the Environmental Protection Act, 1986, bursting crackers within a 100- metre radius of schools, hospitals, courts and religious institutions is a punishable offence.

This Diwali, ensure your and your loved ones safety.

  • Keep a bucket of water handy
  • Be prepared for an emergency

Burns

Burns is the commonest emergency leading to disability or even death. If clothes catch fire,

  • Instead of running around, STOP DROP AND ROLL on the ground to put off the flames. Always cover your eyes, nose and mouth while rolling.
  • A bucket of water may be poured to douse the flames.

Check the victim for burn wounds. Identify the degree of burn and give appropriate first aid. Rush the victim to the hospital.


First Degree Burns

  • First degree burns will be red, painful, but the skin is intact. FIRST AID
    • Remove the heat source.
    • Run room temperature tap water for 10 minutes.
    • Pat dry and see your doctor.

Second Degree Burns

  • Redness, pain, swelling and fluid filled blisters are indicative of second degree burns.

    FIRST AID

    • Remove the heat source. Run room temperature tap water for 10 minutes. Pat dry, loosely wrap a clean dry cloth around the wound and see your doctor.
    • DO NOT BREAK BLISTERS.

Third Degree Burns

  • Skin burnt in third degree looks dry, leathery, black white or ashen in appearance. The victim will NOT experience pain. Shock and hypothermia may complicate the victims condition.

    FIRST AID

    • Do not pour water over the burnt area.
    • If the body turns cold, wrap a blanket around the body, leaving the burnt area bare.
    • Rush to the hospital with the foot end of the victim raised by 8 to 12 inches.
    • If the person is unconscious, keep checking his ABC (Airways, Breathing and Circulation) every two minutes until you reach hospital.
    • If Breathing and Circulation is missing, right away start performing Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation, CPR (if trained to do so.)

Eye Injuries

  • Most of the eye injuries may result into permanent visual loss and force a person to live a visually handicapped life, while in fact such injuries are largely preventable and avoidable. The constant smoke can cause irritability and watering of eyes.

    FIRST AID

    • Do not rub your eyes.
    • Use the corner of a soft clean cloth to draw particles out, or hold the eyelids open and flush the eyes continuously with water.
    • If a particle is large or stuck in the eye, do not attempt to remove it.
    • Keep eyes closed and go to the eye doctor immediately.
    • If there is any chemical that has entered the eyes, immediately irrigate the eyes and under the eyelids, with water, for 20 minutes.

Seek an eye doctor immediately.

Ear Damage

  • Crackers that make a noise of more than 125 decibels at four metres distance from the point of bursting are banned by the law. Given here are the hazards posed by excessive noise pollution caused by crackers:
    • Hearing loss, high blood pressure, heart attack and sleeping disturbances.
    • Sudden exposure to loud noise could cause temporary deafness or permanent relative deafness.

Prevention

  • Avoid use of noisy firecrackers, especially in the vicinity of the elderly, children, sick people and pets.
  • Plug your ears if the noise irritates you.

See your doctor immediately if you experience hearing loss.

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